December 08, 2020 21 min read

In this episode, Connor sits down with Maria and Mozac, two of the great leaders of KidSport Calgary's ambassador program to discuss Local Laundry and KidSport Calgary's recent partnership to create custom Canadian garments for the organization.

Make sure to check out KidSport Calgary's custom collection of garments listed on their website and tune in to the full episode on the Proudly Made in Canada podcast and subscribe on iTunes, Google Play & Spotify! If you're feeling up for more chit chat in the DM's screenshot this episode, tag @locallaundry in Instagram and share the episode on your story. Now, let's get into the episode! 

Listen to the full episode here

Connor Curran:

Live from Studio B, this is Proudly Made in Canada by Local Laundry. I'm your host and co-owner of Local Laundry, Connor Curran. Thank you so much for joining. We're very excited to have two other tremendous guests on the Proudly Made in Canada podcast, Maria and Mosaic, that work as ambassadors of Kidsport. Now Kidsport, for those that don't know, provide financial support to families in order to help overcome monetary barriers that prevent some children from participating. Maria and Mosac are a huge part of what kids sport does, but outside of Kidsport they have their own careers and lives which would be great for them to share as well.

Connor Curran:

So both Maria and Mosac have played rugby at the international level for our country, both coach and give back locally. Maria sits on national boards. We're working on a custom garment with the team in Kids Sport Calgary to celebrate their 25th anniversary. In this episode we're going to dive into the inspiration behind the collaboration, t-shirt, how Kidsport is impacting the Calgary community and ways that you, yes, you, can get involved. Welcome Maria. Welcome Mosac. Please give everyone a quick little intro to who you are and what you do.

Maria:

Sure, thanks Connor and thanks for having us. We're super excited. Sport has been such an important part of our lives. So like you mentioned, we're involved in a lot of things. I played for Canada for five years. I went to the 2014 Rugby World Cup where Canada finished with a silver medal, so a great memory from that time. I was also named the 20 [inaudible 00:01:39] of Rugby Canada player of the year which was out of this world to think that I could even be worthy of such an award. It was pretty neat.

Maria:

And now I sit on the Rugby Canada board of directors, so I'm giving back to rugby in a different way, as well as coaching, head coach of the Mount Royal men's rugby program. And you mentioned an athlete ambassador for Kidsport for going on five years now which is pretty cool.

Mosac:

Yeah, and for myself, Mosac, I also played for the national team. I was with the national training program since 2010, fortunate enough to play here in Calgary hometown in front of friends and family, so that was amazing to wear the maple leaf on your chest and play here locally. I was fortunate to also play professionally in Seattle with the Seattle Sea Wolves winning the inaugural Major League Rugby championships.

Mosac:

And in terms of giving back, I'm the director of rugby for a local team here with the Calgary Saints and shaping their program and shaping the program to something that's more of a community base. And I also assist Maria, I'm her assistant coach at the Mount Royal Men's University team and yeah, that's an interesting dynamic and I do enjoy that. In my professional life, I'm a paramedic by profession and so yeah, I do enjoy that as well.

Connor Curran:

Fantastic. How did you two meet? Two rugby [inaudible 00:02:56] coming together.

Maria:

Well, we met through rugby in probably the least likely place of Fort McMurray, Alberta. Go Knights. We met, I was there on co-op from university in 2006 and we're the [inaudible 00:03:14] right now with the oven going off. Please hold.

Mosac:

Yeah so we had met up with her and then I just ... Actually I was born and raised in Fiji, and I moved from Fiji to Fort McMurray in the winter of 2005. It was plus 40, sorry, in Fiji and then I landed in Edmonton, minus 30, so it was almost a 70 point swing and if you're old enough like we are to remember Cool Runnings, [inaudible 00:03:42] puts on everything in his bag, I can testify, I definitely did attempt to do that.

Connor Curran:

That's so cool. I've never met anyone from Fiji. Somewhere I've always wanted to go. Is it just like, you're born there and as soon as you're born, they put a rugby ball in your hand? Is it [crosstalk 00:03:58]-

Maria:

A rugby ball, a bottle filled with sand, a rolled up t-shirt, whatever they can find they will play rugby with, it's pretty cool.

Mosac:

Absolutely yeah.

Maria:

Yeah. It's funny, my mom always says .... she's not surprised that Mosac and I are together, she's surprised we found each other." Because we were at ends of the world but ... I don't know if it was love at first sight when we first met but it was like, "Yeah, I dig you."

Connor Curran:

I love that. Now I have to ask you, Maria, what university did you go to?

Maria:

I went to McGill. McGill Martlets, yeah.

Connor Curran:

Well, cause I was going to say, "I went to St. Francis Xavier University.

Maria:

Very strong rugby program.

Connor Curran:

We sucked at all sports. The only sport to watch, was the women's rugby team.

Maria:

And they are and were awesome. Yeah. They have a great program. We traveled there in preseason to play against Saint FX and great competition, great rivalry for sure.

Connor Curran:

Yeah. Well it was a blast cause our football team sucked, [inaudible 00:04:58] wasn't that great, so the only game that you would actually want to go watch was the women's rugby team because that was the only one that we pretty much were guaranteed a win.

Maria:

Yeah. They have a whole bunch of athletes that have gone on to play nationally, internationally, Olympics. Ghislaine Landry is probably one of the most famous rugby [inaudible 00:05:19]. Yeah. She's wicked.

Connor Curran:

Yeah, and they were the coolest people to hang out with at the bar because they can drink more than you, they could lift more than you and they were just so down to earth and some of the nicest people, and I'm still friends with some of them to this day.

Mosac:

Oh that's amazing.

Maria:

That's awesome.

Connor Curran:

But yeah, we [inaudible 00:05:34] that. We're big supporters of women's rugby at Saint FX. Yeah so I'm really excited to talk to you guys today. So, how did you ... obviously very, very accomplished in your professional and athletic careers, how did you get involved with Kidsport?

Maria:

Well, we emailed them. I was like, "Hey, we love your cause." And we were actually some of the first athlete ambassadors that really gone on, which then created a much bigger program of having ... I think we're over 20, now, athlete ambassadors. And they've had tons of ambassadors previously who have been involved. Eric Francis, Brian Burke has been involved, but we basically met with one of their coordinators at the time, Dana. She's like, "Well let's go for coffee." And we sat and we chatted and she was like, "Why do you want to be involved in Kidsport?" And we're like, "Why do you love Kidsport? Why do you want athlete ambassadors?" And just a whole bunch of back and forth about Kidsport and our values and what sport has done for us in our life.

Maria:

And so it's an easy decision to stick a name tag on that says, "Kidsport," when everything aligns in terms of what we believe in and in terms of what sport can do for kids, youth, adults. So yeah.

Connor Curran:

Yeah.

Mosac:

Yeah. And for me personally, as someone who moved in from a different country, sport was an avenue to not only socialize, but get to know the cultures and the different norms of a society that I wasn't familiar with. And so seeing a lot of this with kids, it was a no-brainer for me to join something like Kidsport and to be involved with it. And Dana who brought us in, who's now, I believe running the Edmonton chapter of Kidsport, she was an amazing person to meet with, and you could see the passion in her eyes about the cause that she was working for and the organization.

Mosac:

That was something that shone through to the both of us sitting at a Tim Horton's just talking about it. And so, yeah it was that passion and what she was looking at and just the basic cause of eliminating that barrier so that kids can have the opportunity to enjoy sport and to have the aspect of the benefits of sport, and so that was very, very easy to get on board with, and it is one of my favorite charities and one of the ones that I work hard to still be a part of.

Connor Curran:

So you probably get asked all the time from people who don't know anything about the organizations, how would you describe if someone's like, "Hey, what's Kidsport? What is it all about?"

Maria:

The tagline of breaking down barriers so kids can get into sport. That's literally exactly what it is and so, they raise money with ... and I think one of the coolest things about Kidsport, especially Kidsport Calgary, the chapters is that when you give money to them, your money stays in the city. I think that's really cool, and with a 100% of your donation staying within the city, very low administrative costs, that money is going to the kids to play sports.

Maria:

One of the things they do for kids, the parents apply but they pay the team fees in such a non-demeaning manner. So they pay the organization directly. So there's never an awkward conversation of "Hey Johnny, hey Jane, do you have your team fees?" And then they have to turn around to go to their parents and then their parents have to go to Kidsport. Kidsport pays the organization directly, so Johnny and Jane never have to worry about it.

Maria:

It's so small, but it's so important as a child to never have to have that awkward conversation once you're approved as an athlete. And they sponsor so many, you know, they've been around for 25 years.

Connor Curran:

25 years, yeah.

Maria:

Yeah. They started with less than 100 kids that first year. It was 92 and last year I think they hit ... or this year sorry, 25 years they hit $14 million that they invested back into paying kids' dues at sports. So I think 55,000 kids got registered in sports because of that.

Connor Curran:

And to me that's so cool because I can really relate to your story, Mosac, because my parents immigrated here from Ireland, if you couldn't tell from my big, ginger beard. So growing up, I was brought up with a lot of Irish and traditional values and so sport was my outlet and it was my way to really get integrated into the culture. Because even though we spoke the same language and I looked like all the other community kids, I'd never really felt really Canadian until I started ... my sport was basketball.

Connor Curran:

The thing I love about basketball, because there wasn't very much equipment ... very similar, probably to rugby is like, we were the one sport that every kid who came from a different country played. So like, on our team, we had like Filipinos, Sudanese, Irish kids and it was like a real chance for all these other kids from all these different cultures to kind of get together.

Connor Curran:

So that to me was, you know, the power that sport brang, it really introduced us to other cultures and allowed us to hang out. I wanted to hear from you guys, what has sport done for you guys? Why do you believe so much in the power of sport, especially for kids?

Mosac:

Yeah. That's a great question, Connor. And so for me personally, what has sport brought me? So internationally, it's a lot of travel and I love traveling. Believe it or not, people ask me; why did you play for the national team? One of the things was free gear.

Connor Curran:

That's a big part.

Mosac:

Yeah, exactly. Free stuff is always amazing. But other than the monetary, the values of those things, it's friends that, exactly like you said earlier, friends that you aren't in touch with for a lifetime, You've stepped away from the sports and you're still friends with them to this very day. And you know, we have friends that we trained together in a gym that we are from vastly different environments that you would never in a million years come together and meet, and so that's what sport has brought ... it's brought us together from varying backgrounds.

Mosac:

The other part there is a ... and I love that you touched on it. You know, you said in the basketball community there's Sudanese, Filipinos, Irish people and that's the social cultural barriers gone and you have all these different cultures coming together, regardless of gender, what your role is at home or-

Connor Curran:

We had a bunch of Mormons, all the Mormons loved to play basketball, so obviously you get those mixed in too, you know? It's a whole swish swash of everything.

Mosac:

Exactly. And so that to me is just having that opportunity for kids to have that experience is vital. And not only that, the discipline that comes with it, and the opportunity ... as a kid who grew up in the middle of the Pacific, I was now traveling the world. Something I thought was not even possible. And so to break that barrier, to realize that indeed ... you know, the saying is the world is your oyster and you can get out there, that was an amazing opportunity for me to do that.

Mosac:

And then to even play it professionally was something that had never even crossed my mind, and to have that opportunity from a small beginning and just to see the steps, you know, through sports to realize that this is possible. And that was a big thing for me. And I just want kids to have this opportunity to be able to say that, "Yeah, I want to play in the NHL one day," and you can.

Connor Curran:

Correct me if I'm wrong, but you two have children now, right?

Mosac:

We have a child. Yeah, we have a son. He's a February baby. He'll be two in February.

Connor Curran:

Oh, wow. So I mean, as parents, how important is it for you? Have you thrusted a rugby ball ... [inaudible 00:12:49] when he was born?

Maria:

He has a mini rugby ball around here somewhere, it's a size one. Yeah, I mean, super important. Sports is super important, I think the values that I admire in myself, in Mosac, in other people, so many of them have come from sport. And so whether [inaudible 00:13:08] plays rugby or becomes a figure skater, or becomes a doubles tennis player, we don't care but I think being active, and active for life is super important. That they're learning to fail, they're learning to succeed, the resiliency, perseverance. Those are just so important ... teamwork.

Maria:

Even if you're in an individual sport, you still have a team in the sense of having a coach, potentially an equipment manager, you're playing against someone, you know, there's that community aspect of sport that is just so, so, so important that we love. And so it's especially important for our son. I mean, he'll be playing sevens and under nines for rugby, absolutely. And maybe after that, he can make his own choice.

Connor Curran:

Yeah. He'll be politely, gently nudged in the right direction.

Maria:

I mean the kid already sidesteps and he's ... you know.

Connor Curran:

Really?

Maria:

Yeah, he's got some good Polynesian genes.

Connor Curran:

Yeah. Well that brought up something else, Mosac. Was it hard, when you joined Team Canada, did you get any flack from your team or your friends and family from back home?

Mosac:

Well, I mean, I did get asked the question from my ... my grandfather got asked the question, if I was playing against Fiji, who would he support? So I mean, it was obvious he said Fiji, but then my brother asked him, "What if Mosac gets the ball?" And he goes, "Well, I'll just cheer for Mosac." It was one individual you cheered for, and then he always cheered for Fiji [crosstalk 00:14:35]-

Connor Curran:

Did you ever play Fiji?

Mosac:

Sorry, go ahead.

Connor Curran:

Did you ever play Fiji?

Mosac:

No. No, I never got the chance, but yeah, it's been an interesting ... my family dynamic at home in Fiji is very interesting. My brother cheers for New Zealand, the rest of the family cheers for Fiji. I remember this very distinctly growing up, is that Fiji was playing New Zealand in the fall for the Hong Kong Sevens, and New Zealand won and my brother was cheering, and he slept outside that day. He got ostracized from the house quite quickly.

Connor Curran:

I love it. I absolutely love it. But yeah, we're really excited because we've been working a lot with Kidsport for many years now. They were one of the first organizations we ever donated to. I remember when we first started as a business, you know, here we are, we had a couple hundred dollars to donate. We were like, "Yeah." We had the big check and everything. But I love, what you're talking about is that a hundred bucks or a couple hundred bucks, that paid for four or five kids for the year. You know, we actually saw the difference that it made and it's like, every dollar counts.

Connor Curran:

And now they've been at it for 20, 25 years. We recently partnered with Ryan [inaudible 00:15:45] Hopkins of the Edmonton Oilers to create some gear and garments for them, and him and his wife's charity of choice was Kidsport, Edmonton.

Maria:

Amazing.

Connor Curran:

And yeah, so far it's been going well, we've been raised a couple thousand dollars for the charity, and that's like, X amount more kids up in Edmonton. And I've never got to meet Dana personally, but she's up there running this thing, so I've emailed her and I could tell from just her email alone how passionate she is.

Maria:

Wicked.

Connor Curran:

Me and this Dana person, we get along just fine. We're both very excitable. So we worked with Kevin here in Calgary for a long time. Have you guys seen the design? Have you seen the-

Maria:

Yes, it's awesome.

Connor Curran:

Yeah, so when Kevin approached us, and he approached us way back, you know, six, seven months ago to create a shirt to celebrate the 25th anniversary, we were so excited because it's like you said, all the money that they raised stays right here, and to showcase that even more, they wanted to support a local business. You know, we're a local Calgary business. They wanted to support Canadian made. So we made this shirt and it was designed by a local artist, Erin Lawrence, and she took the design and ran with it, the idea that all kids can play.

Connor Curran:

And so the design is a bunch of different sports, bunch of different balls and that kind of thing with smiles on each of them. So we're really looking forward to it. And again, 100% of everything that we sell from these shirts, you know, they're going to be online on the Kidsport Calgary website, is going right back to Kidsport, so that kids can play sports. We're really excited, but I wanted to hear ... so we have the shirts, you guys do your work. What other kinds of campaigns and events you guys do as ambassadors? Like what's your roles as ambassadors to help promote?

Maria:

So, Mosac and I are actually each separately, previous pizza pig out eating champions. So I won one year and then Mosac entered the next year and demolished me. However, it was pretty fun to win. Myself and John Cornish actually tied. I am still protesting by the way, because he had a thin crust pizza, and I had a normal pizza, delicious either way. So, you know what, it's events. So pizza pig out for sure is one of them.

Connor Curran:

Tell us what is this pizza pig out thing?

Maria:

Oh my goodness. Okay, so right now-

Connor Curran:

For those that don't know.

Maria:

Yeah, no, absolutely. So the Eric Francis pizza pig out, it is in its 18th year, this year going virtual because of COVID-19. But basically you can go to the website, Eric Francis Pizza Pig Out YYC, I think, but if you just Google it, it will come out and you can go to any pizzeria that's on the list, buy a pizza. The pizzerias are also giving free pizzas to families that have applied, Kidsport families delivered by your truly athlete ambassadors, which is kind of fun. But when it's live, it's been at the Cowboys Dance Hall, and basically you go, there's 100s and 100s of pizzas, you try pizzas. There's a silent auction, there's a live auction.

Maria:

And then of course, the piece de resistance is this pizza eating competition where, you know, everybody's given a pepperoni, medium size and it's deep dish. I shouldn't even say regular. It's a deep dish pizza, and eat as much as you can in four minutes, which sounds like a long time. But one year there was like, no water so you couldn't drink anything. It was just like, pizza, and you're missing all your saliva, but it's actually amazing how much people can ingest and the crowd gets into it. And there's a giant trophy. It's super fun, but that's ... you know, pizza pig out is one of the ways, there's-

Mosac:

Yeah, just to add to that, when you go in and you vote on the website for the pizzerias, they're all local pizzerias so you're supporting local and we're ... what he's trying to do, what Eric Francis is trying to just find what's the best pizzeria in town, you know, the differences in Hawaiians versus barbecue chicken. Or what's the most unique, and that's what you get in vote.

Mosac:

And apart from that, we also have a back to sport auction that's going on right now, and that runs till November 5th. I was just on the site today. There's a [inaudible 00:19:45] get away for a weekend. I'd highly recommend that. So I might put a bid on that later, but there's a lot of hockey jerseys signed and a lot of cool, cool swag. There's actually a COVID pandemic kit, very appropriate for what's going on right now. So you can bid on that as well. Yeah. So those are a couple of things, and obviously this collaboration that we have going on between Local Laundry again, and Kidsport, two local organizations that I think are amazing to come together and work together on this, and what better way than to buy a t-shirt? We're definitely going to be there, you're definitely going to get ours.

Maria:

[inaudible 00:20:19].

Connor Curran:

Yeah. Yeah, absolutely. Do you guys know much about the sport equipment bank? Can you guys talk a little bit about that?

Maria:

Yeah.

Mosac:

Yeah. You go ahead.

Maria:

Okay. Yeah, so I mean, at the end of the day, the sport bank ... and it's just been renamed and I'm totally blanking right now, but you know, in the same way that Kidsport are providing opportunity to kids, they have sports equipment for kids that are going to play sports. So if you're missing out on a certain piece of equipment, they get donations and basically offer that service, that equipment to kids that need it.

Connor Curran:

Yeah, no, no, it's a fantastic organization. We toured there before and we've donate to there before, and now that they're together and merged with Kidsport, I think it's the perfect combination.

Connor Curran:

And so just before we got started, how long you guys were ... you guys were telling us, how long have you guys been ambassadors to Kidsport?

Maria:

Going on five years now, I think [crosstalk 00:21:07]-

Mosac:

Just under five years, yeah.

Connor Curran:

That's incredible. And for those athletes that are thinking about joining, becoming ambassadors, thinking about just sending a random email, going to have coffee with Kidsport, how many hours per month are you typically volunteering?

Maria:

I think that's definitely variable. I think during the summer months, it's probably more as we're probably attending more events that are able to be outside, like a golf tournament or the target for kids, [inaudible 00:21:32] target for kids. So I think probably on average over the year, we probably put in, you know, a hundred hours by the time we fill out something, or are on amazing podcasts or various things like that, but it's ebbs and flows for sure.

Maria:

I think what's most important is even if you can't give the amount of time, perhaps that Mosac and I give, it's that when you can give that you're 100% engaged. So it's not just about showing up, it's about being there and being part of the cause, because it's still surprising to me that sometimes we walk in and we are treated like celebrities, and the amount of people that want to come and talk to us. But that just gives us such a voice and such an avenue to be able to talk about what sport has done for us. And that gets people reaching into their pockets and donating to the next generation of athletes for life.

Mosac:

I was just saying, just to add on to that, in normal times you have over 40 events that happened through the summer, whether it's the [inaudible 00:22:28] target for kids, you know, golf tournaments and to roundabout answer your question, in terms of the commitment ... because now we have a team of ambassadors, we don't do all the events. So we tag team events, we have a group chat of ambassadors that say, "Hey, this event's coming up, who can join in and go do that?" And people step up and they do that. And so we try to split it evenly so that people aren't being over burdened.

Mosac:

And then the second part to that, one of the biggest things that I think is a function of the ambassador program is your social media reach. There's people who have a really, really big social media reach. For example, Erica Wiebe, Alicia Riesling, they have a big social media reach. So using that platform to then advocate for Kidsport is a huge component. And Rebecca Johnson is a great example as well, using their platform to then just have the awareness and have conversation of kids support as being out there as one of the big things.

Mosac:

To me that doesn't take a lot of effort to repost or post a story, and it's not only improving the Kidsport brand, but your own brand as an ambassador or as an athlete. To me, it's a win-win in that situation.

Connor Curran:

Well, I have to say, you guys take this very seriously. You guys came really prepared for the podcast. No one on the podcast can see, but you guys are in your matching [crosstalk 00:23:47]-

Maria:

We're matching [crosstalk 00:23:48]-

Connor Curran:

The Kidsport outfits, yeah. But you guys should be [inaudible 00:23:52], I know Maria, you said you get treated like celebrities but I think you guys should be, you know, especially looked up to as the kids, you know, not for what you've achieved on the field at an athletic level, but I mean, just looking through your resumes, what you guys have accomplished off the field as well. You know, Maria, you just finished your MBA. You guys are both so accomplished, not only in your professional athletic careers, but off the field as well.

Connor Curran:

I think that's really important for kids to really look up to, that not everyone's going to play professional sports, and that's not the reason you should be playing sports. That's not the reason you should put your kids in it. I thought I was going to be in the NBA, you know, but no one told me that six foot three gingers don't make it into the NBA.

Maria:

Well, you know what's funny? I didn't think I was ... I never had a dream of playing on the national team until I was literally 25. And then I was like, "Oh, I really like sports and I'm actually kind of good." So I just played it because I loved it. And I think that that's the unfortunate thing sometimes with early specialization or whatnot, is that goal of playing for Canada or playing for a professional team, overshadows the fun and the connection and the community and the life skills. And so for me as a coach now, and Mosac as a director of a rugby club, culture is just so important at every level, right? It's not necessarily about reaching the pinnacle. I mean, that can obviously be a goal, but if you don't have the love for the sport, a good culture, you won't make it.

Connor Curran:

Yeah, absolutely, very well said. Well, listen, I don't want to take too much more of your time here, but if people want to support Kidsport, what's the best way that people can support you as ambassadors in Kidsport?

Mosac:

I think ... so for the best thing you can do is first just go to the website, there's a lot of options there. You have the volunteer option. You can donate, you know, obviously with this collaboration, I think grabbing a t-shirt is amazing, and you can definitely do that. Kidsport.ca/Calgary, and then not only that, look for their social media. I believe Kidsport just launched the t-shirt, it's on there, swipe up to the bio, you can definitely just click on there and grab a shirt. So reach out, Kevin's an amazing person. Kevin's very, very organized. And you know, if you want to volunteer for events coming up just quick little email to him will help and all that's present on the website, and through their social media with Twitter and Facebook as well.

Connor Curran:

Yeah. And I heard a couple of other ambassadors just launched a Kidsport podcast. I have it here in my notes here, Face First, I believe it's called, with Grace Dafoe and Alysia Rissling, both tremendous athletes and ambassadors themselves, you could [inaudible 00:26:26] that, take a look at that.

Maria:

Those are two athletes that came from our training group that normally we might've not ran into otherwise, we just happened to train in the same gym and now they're part of our closest circle of friends, so it's-

Connor Curran:

Oh, no way. That's hilarious. Yeah. We've worked with them in the past. Just outstanding human beings in general. I think that's got to be the first criteria for being a Kidsport ambassador you just ... from what I've seen is you just have to be an amazing person.

Maria:

Be a good human.

Connor Curran:

Yeah, yeah, absolutely. But listen, I wanted to thank you two so much for being on the show. Thank you so much for all you do for Kidsport and for all you do for young athletes, it's been an absolute pleasure getting to talk to you. And I'm really looking forward to get to know you both better. Mosac, my wife and I it's ... I said it's a dream to go to Fiji. We're definitely going to be bugging you to get some tips. Maybe friends and family-

Mosac:

Sure.

Connor Curran:

Cheer on some rugby games.

Mosac:

I'll give you a local discount.

Connor Curran:

Yeah, absolutely. Well, thank you so much. This has been Proudly Made in Canada by Local Laundry on your co-host, co-owner, Connor Curran, until next time.

Connor Curran:

Thank you so much for tuning into Proudly Made in Canada by Local Laundry. We are your co-hosts and co-owners Connor Curran and Dustin Paisley. You can find us anywhere anytime at www.locallaundry.ca for all of our Canadian made garments, you can find out what we're up to in the community at Local Laundry and all social channels, sign up for our newsletter, sign up for e-blast and you can find all previous episodes of the podcast wherever you stream your podcast from. Until next time.

 

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